Manage Coveo In-Product Experiences (IPX)

The Coveo In-Product Experience (IPX) feature provides a quick and easy way to deploy and maintain feature-rich, lightweight Coveo search interfaces within your websites and applications.

You can embed your IPX search interface in your websites and applications, and you can use the Coveo Chrome Extension to distribute your IPX interface to company employees through your private domain Google Chrome Web Store. The Coveo Chrome Extension lets employees customize the websites in which your IPX interface appears so they can access personalized intranet content from any website in Google Chrome based on their personal workflows.

You can create and manage IPX interfaces directly from the Coveo Administration Console. By default, an IPX interface appears as a button[1] in the lower right corner of a page. Clicking the button opens a compact search panel. Both the button and search panel can be fully customized.

An IPX interface automatically records Coveo Usage Analytics (Coveo UA) events. This means you can generate reports to gain insight into the way end users are interacting with your IPX interfaces. This also means you can enhance IPX interfaces with Coveo Machine Learning (Coveo ML) capabilities.

IPX Demo

Deploy an IPX Interface (Overview)

Assuming you have access to a Coveo organization with at least one source (preferably one whose content is accessible to everyone), you can use the IPX feature.

Deploying an IPX interface minimally involves the following steps:

Although not mandatory, it’s also strongly recommended to configure query pipelines for your IPX interface.

Optionally, you may also customize your IPX interface by modifying its main button and search panel, and configuring its content access.

Create an IPX Interface

  1. On the In-Product Experiences page, click Add In-Product Experience.

  2. In the Configuration tab, fill the Basic settings section.

  3. (Optional) Use the Design and Content access tabs to customize your IPX interface.

  4. Click Save.

    Creating an IPX interface - 1
  5. In the Loader snippet panel that appears, you may click Copy to save the loader snippet for your IPX interface to your clipboard, and then click Save.

    You can always retrieve the loader snippet later.

    Creating an IPX interface - 2

You’re now ready to load your IPX interface. However, we recommend that you configure query pipelines for your IPX interface before.

Load an IPX Interface

Each IPX interface has a unique Loader snippet with a URL that includes your Coveo organization and the IPX ID.

You can load and deploy an IPX interface using one or both of the following methods:

  • Embed your IPX search interface in websites and applications

    Add the IPX loader snippet to specific websites and applications in your enterprise.

  • Use the Coveo Chrome Extension

    Use the information in your IPX loader snippet to modify the Coveo Chrome Extension package file for use with your IPX interface. You can set a default list of websites in which your IPX search interface appears when using Google Chrome, and quickly distribute your IPX interface to employees through your private domain Google Chrome Web Store. Once the extension is installed, an employee can customize the list of websites to access your IPX search interface and personalized intranet content from anywhere in Google Chrome based on their personal workflows.

  • You can use both integration methods together for increased flexibility. For example, you can embed your IPX search interface in intranet sites that are frequented by all employees, and distribute the Coveo Chrome Extension so that employees can customize where your IPX search interface appears based on their personal workflows.

    In the event that your IPX search interface is embedded in a website, and that same website is added to the Coveo Chrome Extension, only the embedded IPX search interface appears.

  • Both integration methods authenticate employee access to your IPX search interface and content using the permissions and rules that are set in Coveo.

Embed Your IPX Interface in Sites and Applications

Embed your IPX interface in individual websites and applications in your enterprise by using the IPX loader snippet.

This procedure must be executed by a developer who is allowed to modify code in the target website or application.

  1. Ensure that the platform.cloud.coveo.com domain is allowlisted in the website or application in which you want to add the IPX interface.

  2. On the In-Product Experiences page, retrieve the script URL of the IPX interface you want to add to your website or application.

    Retrieving the script URL for an IPX interface
  3. Include a snippet similar to what follows in the head of each page in which you want the IPX interface available:

    <!DOCTYPE html>
    <html>
    <head>
       <!-- ... -->
       <!--  Coveo In-Product Experience -->
       <script type="text/javascript" src="SCRIPT_URL" async ></script>
       <!-- End Coveo In-Product Experience -->
       <!-- ... -->
    </head>
    <body>
       <!-- ... -->
    </body>
    </html>

    An IPX interface script is loaded asynchronously and uses about three kilobytes of memory.

The IPX interface should now appear and be functional when loading any of the target pages in a browser.

IPX Demo

If you have not done so already, we strongly recommend that you configure query pipelines for your IPX interface.

Optionally, you can also customize your IPX interface.

Use the Coveo Chrome Extension

In addition to, or instead of, embedding your IPX search interface in websites and applications, you can use the Coveo Chrome Extension to quickly deploy your IPX instance to company employees through your private domain Google Chrome Web Store. The Coveo Chrome Extension allows employees to use your IPX search interface on any website they choose directly from Google Chrome to access personalized intranet content.

To use the Coveo Chrome Extension, you must create the extension package file for use with your IPX interface by modifying the supplied Coveo Chrome Extension package file, and then upload the extension to your private domain Google Chrome Web Store for distribution.

Create the Chrome Extension Package File

  1. Download the appropriate Coveo Chrome Extension package file based on the Coveo platform:

  2. Unzip the package locally and open the config.json file.

  3. Access your IPX loader snippet from your IPX interface panel’s Configuration tab. You’ll need the information in the loader snippet to modify the config.json file.

  4. Enter the following information in the config.json file:

    • organizationId: Replace <YOUR_ORG_ID> with your Coveo organization ID.

      Your Coveo organization ID appears in the loader snippet:

      IPX loader snippet organization
    • ipxId: Replace <YOUR_IPX_ID> with your unique IPX ID.

      Your IPX ID appears in the loader snippet:

      IPX loader snippet IPX id
    • platformRegion: Replace <REGION_SPECIFIER_IF_APPLICABLE> with your Coveo deployment region identifier.

      Your platform information appears in the loader snippet:

      IPX loader snippet platform
      • If your Coveo region is US East, your platform URL doesn’t include a region identifier as shown in the example loader snippet above. If, for example, your Coveo region is Australia, your platform URL would appear as platform-au.cloud.coveo.com.

      • For multi-region deployments, the region identifier is based on your primary deployment region.

      • For US East, leave the field blank ("").

      • For Ireland, enter "eu".

      • For Australia, enter "au".

    • allowListedDomains: Replace <DOMAINS_TO_ALLOW> with a default list of websites, separated by commas, where you want your IPX interface to appear using the Coveo Chrome Extension. Each employee can later modify the list of websites from the Coveo Chrome Extension configuration panel.

      EXAMPLE

      You have a Coveo platform deployed in US East, you want to add https://www.office.com and https://drive.google.com as the default allowlisted websites, and your IPX interface has the following loader snippet:

      IPX loader snippet

      Your config.json file would be:

      {
        "organizationId": "coveosampleorganization",
        "ipxId": "12345678-9011-1213-1415-161718192021",
        "platformRegion": "",
        "allowListedDomains":  [
              "https://www.office.com",
              "https://drive.google.com"
          ]
      }
  5. Save the config.json file.

  6. Compress your Coveo Chrome Extension package folder.

  7. Deploy your Coveo Chrome Extension.

Deploy Your Coveo Chrome Extension

You can install the Coveo Chrome Extension locally for testing purposes, and then upload it to your private domain Google Chrome Web Store for easy distribution across your enterprise.

Locally

Before uploading your Coveo Chrome Extension to your private domain Google Chrome Web Store for distribution, you should install the extension locally to test its functionality.

  1. Unzip the Coveo Chrome Extension package file you created.

  2. Follow the Google Chrome instructions to install your extension locally.

  3. In a Google Chrome browser window, go to a website that you allowlisted in your Coveo Chrome Extension.

  4. In the Google Chrome taskbar, click the extensions icon Chrome extensions icon, and then click Coveo Chrome Extension. Your IPX interface button appears on the bottom-right of your website.

    To access the IPX search interface, you must Sign in to the Coveo Chrome Extension using your single sign-on (SSO) service.

    You can pin the Coveo Chrome Extension to your Google Chrome taskbar. If you do, click the Coveo Chrome Extension taskbar icon Coveo Chrome extension icon to open the extension.

  5. Test the IPX functionality. For information on the available user functions, see Coveo Chrome Extension User Functions.

Private Domain Google Chrome Web Store

Once you’ve tested your IPX Chrome extension locally, you can upload and publish the extension to your private domain Google Chrome Web Store and distribute the extension to your company employees.

This procedure must be executed by a Google Chrome Web Store developer.

  1. If you haven’t done so already, compress the Coveo Chrome Extension package file you created.

  2. Follow the Google Chrome instructions to upload your extension to your private domain Google Chrome Web Store.

  3. Submit your extension for publication.

    You’ll be required to provide additional information when submitting your extension for publication. When declaring privacy information in the submission panel Privacy tab, note that the Coveo Chrome Extension does not collect user data.

  4. Publish your extension.

  5. Distribute your extension to your company employees.

Coveo Chrome Extension User Functions

Once the Coveo Chrome Extension IPX interface is deployed and installed in Google Chrome, users can access the IPX search interface, modify the list of websites in which the IPX button appears, and hide/show the IPX button.

Access the Coveo Chrome Extension IPX Interface
  1. In the Google Chrome taskbar, click the extensions icon Chrome extensions icon, and then click Coveo Chrome Extension.

    You can pin the Coveo Chrome Extension to your Google Chrome taskbar. If you do, click the Coveo Chrome Extension taskbar icon Coveo Chrome extension icon to open the extension.

  2. If you’re not currently signed in, click Sign in to log in using your SSO credentials. The IPX button appears, typically at the bottom-right, of the website.

    If the IPX button doesn’t appear, the website you’re currently on is not assigned to the Coveo Chrome Extension. To see and modify the list of allowed websites, see Modify the Coveo Chrome Extension IPX Websites.

  3. Click the IPX button to access the IPX search interface.

Modify the Coveo Chrome Extension IPX Websites

The Coveo Chrome Extension IPX button is available only on websites that are specified as being allowed in the extension. A list of default websites were specified when the extension was created, but you can customize the list by removing default websites and adding other websites to better suit your particular workflow.

  1. In the Google Chrome taskbar, click the extensions icon Chrome extensions icon, and then click Coveo Chrome Extension.

    You can pin the Coveo Chrome Extension to your Google Chrome taskbar. If you do, click the Coveo Chrome Extension taskbar icon Coveo Chrome extension icon to open the extension.

  2. Click Allowed URLs Path.

  3. Modify the list of URLs as follows:

    • To remove a website, click the minus sign (-) corresponding to the website.

    • To add a new website, under Allow new URL path, enter the website URL, and then click the plus sign (+).

Hide and Show the IPX Button

You can choose to hide the IPX button if, for example, the button is blocking information on the screen. Hiding and showing the IPX button applies to all websites that are assigned to the Coveo Chrome Extension.

  1. In the Google Chrome taskbar, click the extensions icon Chrome extensions icon, and then click Coveo Chrome Extension.

    You can pin the Coveo Chrome Extension to your Google Chrome taskbar. If you do, click the Coveo Chrome Extension taskbar icon Coveo Chrome extension icon to open the extension.

  2. Do one of the following:

    • To hide the IPX button, click Hide.

    • To show the IPX button, click Show IPX.

When you create an IPX interface, you must specify a search hub value. Among other things, this important parameter is useful for routing search requests to specific query pipelines.

A pipeline can be associated with one or more Coveo ML models. Pipelines may also contain custom relevance tuning rules (thesaurus, featured results, stop words, etc.), allowing you to modify incoming search requests as you see fit.

You will likely want to configure two dedicated pipelines for your IPX interface: one main pipeline to process manual search requests, and one recommendation pipeline to take advantage of the Coveo ML Content Recommendations (CR) feature.

Step 1: Creating the Main Query Pipeline

  1. On the Query Pipelines page, click Add Pipeline.

  2. In the Add a Query Pipeline panel that opens, select the Configuration tab.

  3. In the first box, enter a name for the query pipeline (e.g., MySpeedbitIPX_Main).

  4. (Recommended) Under Condition, select or create an appropriate query pipeline condition to apply.

    Use Search Hub is SEARCH_HUB, where you replace SEARCH_HUB with the actual search hub value used for your IPX interface (e.g., MySpeedbitIPX).

    If you enabled Coveo ML Content Recommendations to allow your IPX interface to suggest content related to the page the end user is currently viewing, you should add the Recommendation is empty condition to the pipeline as follows:

    Creating the main pipeline
  5. Click Add Pipeline.

    Creating the main pipeline

Assuming each pipeline in your organization (except the default one) has a unique condition based on a distinct search hub value, all manual search requests originating from your IPX interface will now be routed to your new pipeline.

Step 2: Enabling Coveo ML ART and QS

Enabling the Coveo ML Automatic Relevance Tuning (ART) and Query Suggestions (QS) features can significantly improve relevance for end users performing manual queries through your IPX interface.

Step 2A: Creating the ART and QS Models

  1. On the Models page, in the upper-right corner, click Add Model to open the Add a Machine Learning Model panel.

  2. Under Name, enter a meaningful display name for the model.

  3. Under Model type, select Automatic Relevance Tuning, and then click Next.

  4. (Optional) In the Learning Interval section, change the default Frequency and Data period values, and then click Next.

  5. (Optional) In the Learn From section, add filters to refine the data that the model uses to make its recommendations, and then click Next.

  6. Click Add Model.

  7. Repeat the above steps, this time selecting Query Suggestions as a Model type.

Creating an ART model

Assuming that enough usage analytics data is available in your organization, Coveo will generate the models. Generating a model typically takes about 30 minutes, depending on the amount of data to process.

Step 2B: Associating the ART and QS Models

  1. Access the main query pipeline you created for your IPX interface.

  2. In the Machine Learning tab, click Associate model.

  3. In the Associate a Machine Learning Model dialog that appears, in the Model drop-down menu, select the ART model you previously created.

  4. Click Associate Model.

  5. Repeat the above steps. This time, in the Model drop-down menu, select the QS model you created before.

    Associating an ART model to the main pipeline

Assuming the platform was able to generate the models, and the main pipeline is properly configured, the Coveo ML ART and QS features should now be enabled in your IPX interface.

Step 3: Enabling Coveo ML CR

Enabling the Coveo ML Content Recommendations (CR) feature will allow your IPX interface to suggest content related to the page the end user is currently viewing.

Step 3A: Creating the Recommendation Query Pipeline

  1. On the Query Pipelines page, click Add Pipeline.

  2. In the Add a Query Pipeline panel that opens, select the Configuration tab.

  3. In the first box, enter a name for the query pipeline (e.g., MySpeedbitIPX_Recommendation).

  4. (Recommended) Under Condition, select or create an appropriate query pipeline condition to apply.

    Use Search Hub is SEARCH_HUB AND Recommendation is Recommendation, where you replace SEARCH_HUB with the actual search hub value used for your IPX interface (e.g., MySpeedbitIPX).

  5. Click Add Pipeline.

Creating the recommendation pipeline

Assuming the recommendation pipeline’s configuration is adequate, no search request should be routed to this new pipeline at this point. You must first create and associate an CR model to the pipeline.

Step 3B: Creating the CR Model

  1. On the Models page, in the upper-right corner, click Add Model to open the Add a Machine Learning Model panel.

  2. Under Name, enter a meaningful display name for the model.

  3. Under Model type, select Content Recommendations, and then click Next.

  4. (Optional) In the Learning Interval section, change the default Frequency and Data period values, and then click Next.

  5. (Optional) In the Learn From section, add filters to refine the data that the model uses to make its recommendations, and then click Next.

  6. (Optional) In the Recommended Item Types section, choose the type of items that the model will recommend.

  7. Click Add Model.

Creating a CR model

Assuming that enough usage analytics data is available in your organization, Coveo will generate the model. Generating a model typically takes about 30 minutes, depending on the amount of data to process.

Step 3C: Associating the CR Model

  1. Access the main recommendation query pipeline you created for your IPX interface.

  2. In the Machine Learning tab, click Associate model.

  3. In the Associate a Machine Learning Model dialog that appears, in the Model drop-down menu, select the CR model you previously created.

    CR models cannot be associated with pipelines that contain other model types.

  4. Click Associate Model.

Associating an CR model to the recommendation pipeline

Assuming the platform was able to generate the CR model, and the recommendation pipeline is properly configured, the Coveo ML CR feature should now be enabled in your IPX interface.

Step 4: Defining Custom Relevance Tuning Rules (Advanced)

If needed, you can define custom relevance tuning rules in the configuration page of the main query pipeline you have created for your IPX interface.

Use the following table as a reference:

Rule type Use case

Thesaurus

Defines synonyms to expand in user queries.

Featured results

Provides a high ranking score boost to certain items.

Stop words

Defines terms to ignore in the basic query expression (q).

Ranking expressions

Increases or decreases the ranking scores of certain items by a certain amount.

Ranking weights

Fine-tunes the default weights of the standard index ranking factors.

Triggers

Defines actions to execute in the search panel under certain circumstances.

Filters

Appends expressions to the basic (q), advanced (aq), constant (cq), disjunction (dq), or large (lq) query expression.

Query parameters

Sets or overrides the values of certain search request parameters.

Customizing an IPX Interface

Modifying the Main Button

This procedure must be executed by a developer who knows how to use the JavaScript Search Framework.

  1. In your IPX’s configuration page, select the Design tab.

  2. In the Main button section, modify the settings as desired, and then click Save. The changes take effect immediately.

    Modifying the main button of an IPX interface

Advanced Main Button Modification Using CSS

For increased flexibility when embedding your IPX in websites and applications, you can use the following elements in the CSS of your web page to modify the style of the IPX button, the button icon, and the button text.

  • Modifying the style attributes of the IPX button using the above CSS elements overrides the corresponding settings in the IPX configuration Design tab. For example, if you set the button color in the Design tab, and then specify a different color in the CSS, your IPX interface uses the color specified in the CSS of the corresponding web page.

  • If you’re using the Coveo Chrome Extension, users can customize the websites in which your IPX interface appears. For websites that don’t include your CSS styling, the IPX button appears as set in the IPX configuration Design tab.

  • coveo-in-app-widget-loader::part(button): Modifies the style of the IPX button.

  • coveo-in-app-widget-loader::part(button-text): Modifies the style of the text that appears in the IPX button.

  • coveo-in-app-widget-loader::part(button-icon): Modifies the style of the icon that appears in the IPX button.

In the CSS of your web page that includes your IPX interface, add one or more of the above elements within a style tag and specify the attributes as required using standard CSS rules.

EXAMPLE

You want the IPX button width to adjust to the button text. You add the following style tag to your web page HTML:

<style> coveo-in-app-widget-loader::part(button) { width: inherit; } coveo-in-app-widget-loader::part(button-text) { max-width: unset; } </style>

Deploying an IPX Inside a Native Component (Advanced)

To deploy an IPX interface inside a native component of your website or application instead of attaching it to the default button, you can use the Target selector section.

The Target selector section lets you replace the default IPX button by a custom open/close mechanism integrated within your website or application.

  1. In your IPX’s configuration page, select the Design tab.

  2. In the Target selector box, enter a CSS selector to the element that should replace the default IPX button (e.g., #myElementId).

  3. Click Save.

    screen capture of the target selector section in the Coveo Administration Console

Modifying the Search Panel (Advanced)

You can use the Interface Editor in the Administration Console to customize the search panel.

  1. In your IPX’s configuration page, select the Design tab.

  2. In the Search Panel section, click Use the interface editor.

    Modifying the search panel of an IPX interface - 1
  3. In the Interface Editor window, select the Code view tab.

  4. Modify the search panel markup configuration as desired, and then click Save.

    Modifying the search panel of an IPX interface - 2

The changes take effect immediately.

To fully customize the look and functionality of an IPX, Coveo also provides an IPX starter project. You can use this project to edit the HTML, CSS, and JavaScript of an IPX, and then push that code to Coveo so that your IPX can use it. You can even have multiple IPX interfaces, each independently managed through version control.

Configuring Content Access (Advanced)

When embedding your IPX interface in websites and applications, the IPX interface uses the same generic search token to authenticate all users by default. This token is meant to grant access to publicly available content only. You can modify the information to include in the generic search token directly through the Administration Console.

If you would rather use a distinct search token for each authenticated user to provide access only to the secured content they’re allowed to view, you must instead implement advanced search token authentication.

When using the Coveo Chrome Extension, configuring content access using the steps described in this section isn’t required. The Coveo Chrome Extension uses an OAuth 2.0 authentication flow to acquire the access token for a signed-in user in your IPX interface. This means that when using the Coveo Chrome Extension, users have access only to the secured content they’re allowed to view.

Option 1: Modifying the Default Content Access Settings

Follow this procedure only if you want to modify the information to include in the search token that gets generated by default for all users of an IPX interface.

If you want each end user to be able to access the secured content they’re allowed to view in your IPX interface, you must instead implement advanced search token authentication.

  1. In the configuration page for your IPX interface, select the Content access tab.

  2. In the Default settings section, modify the settings as desired, and then click Save.

    Modifying the content access settings for an IPX interface

The changes take effect immediately.

Option 2: Implementing Advanced Search Token Authentication

This procedure must be executed by a developer who is allowed to modify code in the target website or application.

Implementing advanced search token authentication requires you to add server-side logic to your website or application. Therefore, the actual implementation details will vary from one project to another. This procedure only provides generic guidelines.

In summary, you must write server-side code that performs the following actions:

  1. Authenticate the user.

  2. Call a service exposed through Coveo to request a search token for the authenticated user.

    POST https://platform.cloud.coveo.com/rest/search/token HTTP/1.1
    Content-Type: application/json
    Accept: application/json
    Authorization: Bearer **********-****-****-****-************
    {
      "userIds": [
        {
          "name": "asmith@example.com",
          "provider": "Email Security Provider"
        }
      ]
    }
  3. In the snippet for the IPX interface to load, inject the access_token=TOKEN query parameter into the script URL (where TOKEN must be replaced by the actual search token that was generated for the authenticated user).

    <!--  Coveo In-Product Experience -->
    <script type="text/javascript" src="https://platform.cloud.coveo.com/rest/organizations/speedbit1a2b34d5e/pages/abc8ccfe-bf50-42e7-a140-475420cbc543/inappwidget/loader?access_token=eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJ2OCI6dHJ1ZSwib3JnYW5pemF0aW9uIjoic3BlZWRiaXQxYTJiMzRkNWUiLCJ1c2VySWRzIjpbeyJwcm92aWRlciI6IkVtYWlsIFNlY3VyaXR5IFByb3ZpZGVyIiwibmFtZSI6ImFzbWl0aEBleGFtcGxlLmNvbSIsInR5cGUiOiJVc2VyIn1dLCJyb2xlcyI6WyJxdWVyeUV4ZWN1dG9yIl0sImV4cCI6MTU3OTgwMzcxNSwiaWF0IjoxNTc5NzE3MzE1fQ.aPFX20a7IdvtKuw89len98fDqMbSo87ER7isSCn-Q90" async ></script>
    <!-- End Coveo In-Product Experience -->
  4. Serve the page, including the snippet in its head.

For more information and examples, see Search Token Authentication.

Passing Custom Context (Advanced)

This procedure must be executed by a developer who knows how to use the JavaScript Search Framework.

Passing custom context through an IPX interface helps train Coveo ML models to provide more relevant results to users (see About Custom Context).

To do so:

  1. Ensure that your IPX interface contains a PipelineContext component.

    A PipelineContext component is included by default in all IPX interfaces created after March 10th, 2020. For older IPX interfaces, you can add a PipelineContext component using the Interface Editor.

  2. Once the CoveoInProduct global variable is available, set the custom context as needed by invoking the setContextValue and/or setContext methods.

EXAMPLE

You want to collect information from the registered users on the Speedbit Dashboard (i.e., their subscription level, age group, and which Speedbit products they already own) to better provide suggestions as to what they may need next.

Assuming you have implemented the getSubscriptionLevel, getAgeGroup, and getOwnedProducts functions to retrieve the target values, you can use them to pass custom context as follows:

<head>
   <!-- ... -->
   <!--  Pass custom context to IPX  -->
   <script>
      // Wait for IPX interface to load...
      window.addEventListener('load', () => {
         CoveoInProduct.setContext({
            "subscriptionLevel": getSubscriptionLevel(),
            "ageGroup": getAgeGroup(),
            "ownedProducts": getOwnedProducts()
         });
      });
      function getSubscriptionLevel() { /* Implementation here... */ }
      function getAgeGroup() { /* Implementation here... */ }
      function getOwnedProducts() { /* Implementation here... */ }
   </script>
   <!-- End pass custom context to IPX -->
   <!-- ... -->
</head>

Testing an IPX with JavaScript Injection

You can use script injection tools to test your IPX on your hosting domain. This is particularly useful when running a demo and investigating where this integration would make the most sense. For example, using Tampermonkey, you can fill in and use the following template to inject your IPX into a page:

// ==UserScript==
// @name         IPX Demo Template
// @namespace    http://tampermonkey.net/
// @version      0.1
// @description  Coveo In-Product Experience
// @author       you@name.com
// @match        <YOUR_SITE_NAME>
// @grant        none
// @noframes
// ==/UserScript==
(function() {
    'use strict';
    const script = document.createElement('script');
    script.type = 'text/javascript';
    script.src = '<IPX_SCRIPT_REFERENCE>';
    document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0].appendChild(script);
})();

Replace <YOUR_SITE_NAME> with the name of your hosting site, and <IPX_SCRIPT_REFERENCE> with your script URL.

Deleting an IPX

  1. Ensure that the loader snippet for the IPX interface you want to delete is no longer included in any page of your website or application. Otherwise, the console will display a 404 error when the browser attempts to load the script.

  2. On the In-Product Experiences page, click the IPX interface you want to delete.

  3. In the Action bar, click Delete, and then click Delete again.

    Modifying the content access settings for an IPX interface

The IPX interface is immediately and irreversibly deleted.

Supported Browsers

An IPX interface must be accessed from a browser that supports Web Components.


1. It’s possible to deploy an IPX interface inside a native component of your website or application instead of attaching it to the default button.
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